Davis & Shirtliff to distribute SMA Solar Technology inverters in East Africa

Davis & Shirtliff has already sold 70 SMA inverters in the East African market with both partners focusing mainly on the solar off-grid.

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Davis & Shirtliff, a Kenyan company specializing in the supply of water and energy equipment, has signed a deal with German company SMA Solar Technology, to distribute SMA’s photovoltaic inverters in East Africa.

SMA Solar Technology manufactures inverters for photovoltaic installations used to transfer electricity into the grid.

Davis & Shirtliff has already sold 70 SMA inverters in the East African market with both partners focusing mainly on the solar off-grid.

The company, based in Hesse – Central Germany, has chosen Kenya as its base in East Africa, at a time when the growth of solar market is promising in the continent and renewable energy projects coming up in multiples. It will market its inverters through Davis & Shirtliff.

Off-grid electricity distribution system has gained traction with many companies turning to it.

“The installation of an off-grid solar system can significantly reduce the electricity bill and therefore the operating costs of manufacturers,” said Phillip Holi, Technical Director of Davis & Shirtliff.

With the introduction of its photovoltaic inverters, SMA has tapped into the perfect business climate where more companies are investing in the solar off-grid systems.

Sub-Saharan Africa has recently been receiving many investment proposals and interests on the growth of the renewable energy sector. The British government announced that it is keen on investing more than US$127m in renewable energy projects to prompt the growth of the sector in sub-Saharan Africa.

Renewable Energy companies in East Africa have been receiving grants and credit facilities to finance their activities within the region led by Investor group; Inspired Evolution, an investment advisory firm specializing in the energy sector in Africa; Norfund, a Norwegian private equity firm, the Netherlands Development Finance Corporation (FMO), and Swedbank, a bank based in Stockholm, Sweden.